stoweboyd:

Andrew Kim channels Mary Shelley and tries to reanimate the lifeless carcass of Microsoft through a magisterial rebranding. ‘Be almost science fiction.’
I hope Microsoft has the sense to hire this guy, at least as a consultant.
(via The Next Microsoft - journal - minimally minimal)

stoweboyd:

Andrew Kim channels Mary Shelley and tries to reanimate the lifeless carcass of Microsoft through a magisterial rebranding. ‘Be almost science fiction.’

I hope Microsoft has the sense to hire this guy, at least as a consultant.

(via The Next Microsoft - journal - minimally minimal)

Randy Haykin, the founder of The Intersection Event, shared some of his thoughts on the importance of combining business innovation with social change in an interview with PSFK.

With all the changes going on, it is easy to observe examples of the intersection of innovation and social change in all walks of life. Examples of this are already in play: Innovations in social media affect political balance (think Egypt, Syria, and the IAVA); innovations in technology affect biotech, agriculture, food and oil production (think Water.org or Solayzme); innovations in business models affect the ways that goods and services from Africa, India, and Latin America can be brought to the rest of the world (think Kiva.org or World of Good), and there is so much more that it’s dizzying to keep up with it each week…

Some of the greatest inventions the world has seen were developed incrementally as one person built on another’s ideas, sometimes transcending decades or even centuries between them. What makes for a real innovation is that someone takes a previous idea and juxtapositions it in new light, or with a new twist, or in a new context. That means finding the intersection between the original observation or thought and the new environment or situation. The most fertile areas for innovation–and the most new ideas–are likely to occur at the intersection of several great minds.

Via PSFK
"Some people flunk out of school, but are still very interesting people. They’re not in the class that goes ahead, but maybe you’d like to go visit them."

— David Lynch (via matthewb)

matthewb:

Photography by Matthias Schaller from an eponymous 330-page retrospective of his work over the past decade, available now for pre-order from Amazon. (via Daily Icon)

Created with a translated Processing(Java) library for Python, this series of complex shapes and forms was created by manipulating a single line of code with various programming functions, and parametric equations similar to “x = radius * cosine(t), y = radius * sin(t)” in particular.

As a result, Parametric End's abstract forms build upon themselves to produce hidden complexities and depths, distinct symmetries, and moiré patterns.

Via helloauan